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Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Book Review: I Hate Everyone But You

Book Review: I Hate Everyone But You

Book Review: I Hate Everyone But You
I Hate Everyone But You by Gaby DunnAllison Raskin
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Release Date: September 5th 2017
Pages: 352
Source: ALA

Dear Best Friend,I can already tell that I will hate everyone but you.Sincerely,Ava Helmer(that brunette who won’t leave you alone)

We're still in the same room, you weirdo.Stop crying.G

So begins a series of texts and emails sent between two best friends, Ava and Gen, as they head off to their first semesters of college on opposite sides of the country. From first loves to weird roommates, heartbreak, self-discovery, coming out and mental health, the two best friends will document every moment to each other. But as each changes and grows into her new life, will their friendship be able to survive the distance?

I Hate Everyone But You, the debut novel by two emerging major talents in YA, Allison Raskin and Gaby Dunn, is a story about new beginnings, love and heartbreak, and ultimately about the power of friendship.

I’ve been sitting on this book and mulling over how I feel for a couple of days now. I loved the idea of the premise. As someone who has moved a lot, a story about dealing with those long distance friendships was a welcomed sight. And while this book did deal with that a bit, it also had things that weren’t so welcomed.

First things first, this a modern-day epistolary book. The whole things is told via Ava and Gen’s emails and texts. This makes for a quick read and generally works okay. You get the basic story and the general emotion of each girl. The emails and texts are sometimes a bit over the top, but that’s to be expected. However, at the same time, I did wish for more details at times. I felt like I was missing something by not being in the moment. I’m also hoping the final version will have dates and time stamps attached. It was really hard to gauge the passage of time between communication unless one of the girls drops a season/how long it’s been in one of their messages.

WARNING: MASSIVE SPOILERS AHEAD

There are a couple of things that made the book go south for me. One, is the relationship between Gen and her TA, Charlotte. One moment, Charlotte is simply helping her edit her piece for the paper. Innocent and appropriate enough, right? Well, you blink and they’re suddenly lovers, in the loosest sense of the word. I can hear you saying, what’s the big deal, they’re both adults? Well, yes, but it still feels wrong. For one, Charlotte is in a position of power both as her TA and later as faculty advisor for the paper. Two, Charlotte is 32. That’s a huge difference, especially at that age. Three, Gen is not the only student she is sleeping with. There is at least one other girl, who Gen was also sleeping with, but it definitely sounded like it has been more. It just utterly and completely rubbed me the wrong way, especially when you throw in a transphobic storyline. Without telling the whole story, Charlotte is accused of writing transphobic pieces in the past, which ultimately leads to Gen quitting the newspaper, the whole reason she picked the college she did. If the Gen and Charlotte line had ended there, I would have chalked it up to being at college and experimenting. However, even after all that, Gen ditches Ava, who is visiting over Thanksgiving, to go have a weekend tryst with Charlotte. Considering how much of the book revolved around this pretty unhealthy relationship, I wanted to scream.

With Ava, it was her mental illness. Something about how it all was handled felt a bit off the entire book for me. Ava definitely had OCD, depression, and anxiety. I feel like there may be more going on, but if so, it’s not given a name. I have my own theories, though. The general portrayal is not my issues, but how past events are thrown in. For example, she’s also a cutter. There is a slight edge of urgency to it, but it’s only mentioned a couple times and dropped completely once Gen tells her mom. There’s only this weird spot where it’s nonchalantly mentioned that Ava tried to kill her mom in 6th grade once. It’s meant as a ploy to show how important it is for her to be on the right medication, but it still felt a bit odd. This, however, may go back to the epistolary-no-details issue I had above, but at times I felt like there was just a check list of all the things wrong with Ava mentally.

I’ve debated on if I wanted to mentioned this, but thought I would at least briefly. When Gen comes out, there’s a lot of mislabeling on Ava’s part. Repeatedly, Ava calls her gay. Gen does correct her by saying she still likes boys and does bring up bisexuality, but Ava to a point still implies she’s gay since Gen is mainly sleeping with women. It does seem to stop once Gen labels herself as queer, but it still irritated me a little. Especially when there was a whole passage about how could Gen fantasize about a man when she was gay! I know a lot of this is supposed to be that Ava is a poor sheltered girl (there are several other painful questions especially about trans stuff), but it’s a little unbelievable considering she’s in modern day L.A. I don’t expect her to be fully enlightened, but I would expect her to know more at her age.

In part, a lot of that may have to do that this book felt like Dunn and Raskin maybe took their own college experiences or YouTube stories and crammed them into this book, especially since they name/link dropped their own YouTube channel in the middle of the book.  Honestly, I’m not really sure I would consider this a teen book. Maybe more NA? I don’t know the voices used just didn’t feel too authentic to me. It felt a lot like 30 year olds pretending to be college students.

In the end, this book wasn’t for me at all, but considering how many people are raving about it, this may be a “it’s not you, it’s me” situation. Or maybe if I had been a fan of Dunn and Raskin’s in general, it may have had stronger appeal. I’ll be interesting to see if things shift once the book is out and more reviews are posted.

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2

I fell a bit behind this week, but I hope to catch up next week. Here’s what I read

 

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2
Asking for It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture and What We Can Do about It by Kate Harding
Publisher: Da Capo Lifelong Books
Release Date: June 27th 2015
Pages: 272
Source: Library

Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s arrest. Congressman Todd Akin’s “legitimate” gaffe. The alleged rape crew of Steubenville, Ohio. Sexual violence has been so prominent in recent years that the feminist term “rape culture” has finally entered the mainstream. But what, exactly, is it? And how do we change it?
In Asking for It, Kate Harding answers those questions in the same blunt, bullshit-free voice that’s made her a powerhouse feminist blogger. Combining in-depth research with practical knowledge, Asking for It makes the case that twenty-first century America—where it’s estimated that out of every 100 rapes only 5 result in felony convictions—supports rapists more effectively than victims. Harding offers ideas and suggestions for addressing how we as a culture can take rape much more seriously without compromising the rights of the accused.

Whew, this was a doozy of a book, but in a good way. This is a book that everyone needs to read no matter the gender. It’s fitting that I read it right before that horrid Bloomingdale’s ad appeared. Rape culture is far from being conquered and the only way we’re going to do so is if we continue to talk about it and correct our behavior.

 

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2
Don't Fail Me Now by Una LaMarche
Publisher: Razorbill
Release Date: September 1st 2015
Pages: 288

Michelle and her little siblings Cass and Denny are African-American and living on the poverty line in urban Baltimore, struggling to keep it together with their mom in jail and only Michelle’s part-time job at the Taco Bell to sustain them. Leah and her stepbrother Tim are white and middle class from suburban Maryland, with few worries beyond winning lacrosse games and getting college applications in on time.   Michelle and Leah only have one thing in common: Buck Devereaux, the biological father who abandoned them when they were little.   After news trickles back to them that Buck is dying, they make the uneasy decision to drive across country to his hospice in California. Leah hopes for closure; Michelle just wants to give him a piece of her mind.   Five people in a failing, old station wagon, living off free samples at food courts across America, and the most pressing question on Michelle’s mind is: Who will break down first--herself or the car? All the signs tell her they won’t make it. But Michelle has heard that her whole life, and it’s never stopped her before....   Una LaMarche triumphs once again with this rare and compassionate look at how racial and social privilege affects one family in crisis in both subtle and astonishing ways.

I enjoyed this one. There were a couple of little things that were problematic, but overall I loved the road trip aspect and the economical differences. Not to mention there were a lot of heartstrings pulled involving absent parents and what it means to be a family. This one easily was added to me booktalk list.

 

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2
How to Be Brave by E. Katherine Kottaras
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Release Date: November 3rd 2015
Pages: 272

Reeling from her mother's death, Georgia has a choice: become lost in her own pain, or enjoy life right now, while she still can. She decides to start really living for the first time and makes a list of fifteen ways to be brave - all the things she's wanted to do but never had the courage to try. As she begins doing the things she's always been afraid to do - including pursuing her secret crush, she discovers that life doesn't always go according to plan. Sometimes friendships fall apart and love breaks your heart. But once in a while, the right person shows up just when you need them most - and you learn that you're stronger and braver than you ever imagined.

I have a larger review for this one, which will go up on Wednesday. I liked the book, but it did have some things that made me raise my eyebrows. However, some of the scenes and quotes were amazing. It’ll be one I will still tell the teens about, but wasn’t good enough to be one I booktalk.

 

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2
Non Non Biyori Vol. 1 by Atto
Series: Non Non Biyori #1
Publisher: Seven Seas
Release Date: June 30th 2015
Pages: 180

Welcome to the countryside village of Asahigaoka, a quaint town far-removed from the hustle-and-bustle of the big city. You couldn’t imagine a more isolated setting in all of Japan. So when Tokyo-raised elementary school student Hotaru Ichijo transfers to the tiny Asahigaoka Branch School due to her father’s job, she’s in the for the culture shock of her life!
Join Hotaru and her new friends, the eccentric Renge, and the mischevious sisters Natsumi and Komari, as they share daily adventures in the idyllic Japanese countryside.

This one was a cute and silly manga. Easily one that is good for my younger manga-readers. It is rated Teen, but judging from the first volume it’s going to be a mild one that can be handed to 5th grade and up with no issues.

 

30 Day Reading Challenge: Week 2
Rose Guns Days Season 1 Vol. 1 by Ryukishi07, Souichirou
Series: Rose Guns Days #1
Publisher: Yen Press
Release Date: September 22nd 2015
Pages: 192

After suffering unprecedented disasters in World War II, Japan accepts the American and Allied Forces' terms of unconditional surrender. Now the citizens of a ruined nation, the people of Japan come together amid an influx of influences and immigrants and--cunningly, carefully--survive...
This is the unrecognizable Japan to which the sharpshooting, sweet-talking womanizer Leo Shishigami returns three years after the war. Against this backdrop, in the spring of 1947, everything is set into motion when Leo meets Rose Haibara, the madam of Club Primavera...

Ahh, this manga totally reminds me of old school type stuff. It has this total Trigun feel to it that I love. It is definitely older teen though. While there has not been any nudity, there are women of the night and the main villain is a complete sexual predator who has made it known he has no problem taking what he wants. However, everything is implied but not shown, which makes me okay leaving it on my teen shelves.